Exclusive Interview: Jazzfeezy Talks College, Meeting Boi-1da & T-Minus, How to Network as a Producer & More

Jazzfeezy boasts of an extensive music catalogue that has led to placements with artists like Drake, T.I., Young Dro, Young Thug, Lil Durk, and lots more. His catalogue is wide-ranging, varying from the oscillating instrumental of Drake’s retrospective rap on “Can’t Have Everything” all the way to club certified anthems like Bankroll Mafia’s “Hyenas.” His production projection is incalculable, as he’s constantly pumping out new sounds that ultimately shape the hip-hop world’s forecast. His sounds are so much so sought after, that he and Boi-1da decided to team up to create the Boi-1da Sound Kits series, a drum kit that led to over 200,000 downloads.

The Barrie, Ontario native is humble yet jokey, possessing an easygoing, nonchalant attitude that’s rarely witnessed on record, seemingly preserved for his studio sessions or non-musical past times. A scroll through his Instagram would unveil that the recording studio is his playground and the soundboard his chin-up bars. In rare form, Jazzfeezy recently sat down with me to discuss an array of different topics. He dished on everything from his decision to drop out of college, to meeting Boi-1da and T-Minus, his thoughts on producers playing beats on Instagram live, and networking in the digital age. Here are some snippets from the interview below:

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On the best way to market yourself as a producer:
The thing is how do you keep the people that are on your page interested? I think some of the pages that I go to–no knock on anyone that does this, power to them–guys that always have pictures of their speaker with a set beat that they made for the day. That’s fine, but for the overall consumer, how does someone know that you’re someone in the studio every day who’s actively doing stuff? Are you putting quotes? It’s very viable to make sure whoever’s on your page is kinda watching you. Whether it’s an artist wanting to buy a beat, or a manager wanting to get beats for their artist, or even a label. How can you keep enticing them? And letting them know you’re doing this on a serious platform, rather than throwing up random pictures everyday.

His thoughts on the digital age:
Now more than ever the accessibility to people is insane. You can DM someone that’s of any calibur–engineer, producer, even a star. Before you’d have to go to a label and set up a meeting, and they’d have to see how you are, and you may or may not be able to play beats for the manager or artist. But now you have this crazy accessibility that can get stuff right to people. It’s good and bad. It just makes the competition amongst everyone more fierce.

Listen to the full  audio interview here:

 

The views of our contributors are their own, and not necessarily those of Boi-1da.